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Salmon, sesame, green bean stir fry

1 Feb

20131005-213906.jpgContinuing with my healthy eating theme, I have been back on the stir fries over the weekend. So quick, so easy, so delicious. I have loved this article on buzzfeed for some inspiration, a great selection of blogs that I probably would never have found otherwise, and a lot of them are easily FODMAPable.

Let’s be honest, stir fries are great. A great way to eat a load of fresh veg, and they take about 20 mins from getting in the door to sitting down to eat.

I made the Asian Salmon and Green Bean Stir fry over the weekend, and also another prawny stir fry – they are the best thing for healthy, new year eating, especially if you’re also going to the gym and want something quick and easy when you get home.

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The key is not to buy the ready made stir fry veg – on the FODMAP diet there are things in there that aren’t going to be any good for you, and my opinion, there’s waaay too many beansprouts and not enough of the good stuff – peppers, baby corn, courgette etc.

All stir fries are fundamentally the same – meat or tofu and loads of FODMAP friendly veg (peppers, courgettes, green beans, corn, etc), It’s the sauce that adds a bit of interest. So here for you are some suggested, easy stir fry sauces that you can use with your favourite veg, meat or fish.

GF Soy and Wasabi

  • 2tbsp x GF Soy sauce
  • 1-2tsp x wasabi (or to taste)

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GF Soy and dried chilli

  • 2tbsp x GF soy sauce
  • 1tsp x dried chilli flakes

Ginger, lime and chilli

  • 1 cm fresh ginger, grated
  • juice of half a lime
  • fresh or dried chilli flakes, to taste

GF soy, sesame, maple and spice

This was a recent trial based on the delicious Maple, Peanut, Sesame Chicken recipe and it works really well as a stir fry sauce

  • 1tbsp x maple syrup
  • 1tbsp x sesame oil
  • 2tbsp x GF soy
  • 1tbsp x sesame seeds
  • fresh chilli (to taste)

 

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My first #MeatFreeMonday (it’s not FODMAP, I confess – it is GF though!)

7 Jan

IMG_4415-1Ok, Ok, I start with a confession, my first blog of 2015 is not actually FODMAP, I know, on a FODMAP blog – what am I doing?! Well, I’ve always thought, what with the restrictions on fruit and veg, how easy is the FODMAP diet for a vegetarian, or even more so a vegan? For me, a meat eater, I know that if I go out for dinner I am inevitably going to be able to find a meal which consists of meat. rice or potatoes but most veggie options seem to be pizza or pasta, or a bean burger or something of that vein which is not good for a FODMAPper. And I am still confused quorn? is that ok? I dont think so… And tofu is a beast I have never attempted (but I will, promise!).

So I should be being more helpful really and actually try to find something – I know. But in my defence, this recipe sounded delicious, Red Thai Curry lentils. I love all thai food, and lentils are another thing I have never attempted, but I got some in a GF hamper from my lovely dad and step mum, so I thought hell, I’ve never cooked them and rarely eaten them, so I decided to give them a go, and better still I have been eating small portions of this for the last couple of days and my tummy has been fine (had it not, I probably would have sworn off lentils forever and definitely wouldn’t be sharing this with you! And, of course, these are as delicious as I thought they would be!

As always I used the recipe as inspiration and made a few little tweaks.

I used this red curry paste:

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It’s super tasty, gluten free and not too oniony/garlicy.

Makes about 5 portions

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cup lentils (I used red split)
  • bunch spring onions (green part only)
  • splash of oil
  • 3 tblsp red curry paste
  • 1/2 tbsp garam masala
  • 1/2 tsp tumeric
  • 1 tsp minced ginger
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 tin tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • coriander to garnish (this actually really adds to the flavour)

Method

  1. Cook lentils according to instructions (approx 10mins boiling) once cooked, drain and put to one side
  2. Heat up oil, add spring onions and fry on a medium heat for a couple of mins.
  3. Add the red curry paste and fry for 2 mins, stirring
  4. Add the garam masala, tumeric, ginger and sugar, give it a stir
  5. Add the coconut milk and tinned tomatoes and stir for a further couple of minutes,
  6. Add the lentils back in, give it a stir, and leave to simmer for 20-30mins, stirring occasionally.
  7. Et Voila, delicious filling lentil curry. sprinkle with a little coriander and you are good to go!

(and anyone doing WW a portion of this is approx. 8 propoints & it’s very filling)

Tom Yum Inspired Thai Chicken Soup

13 Nov

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The Fod-a-licious kitchen was a-buzz with cooking last week (think two Tazmanian devils in a whirlwind of flour!) in aid of a little dinner party we were holding on Friday night – the fruits of our labours will all be blogged shortly, but we made – burgers, BBQ sauce, flat bread, brownies and the Tom Yum inspired soup detailed below! All of which were FODMAP, Gluten and dairy free, well other than a small amount of milk choc in the brownies, but that didn’t need to be there, as I will explain when I get round to blogging that recipe!

Thai food is my absolute favourite, I spent a couple of months there a few years ago, and on my return all I wanted was more Thai food! So this is a tasty and easy, great for winter soup. Which I am sure is not very close to the original (no prawns for example), but I love it! I have looked at lots of recipes and they are all fairly similar, so this is a bit of a mix of everything, super easy and super tasty. I also think it doesn’t necessarily need the chicken, it works well as a light vegetarian option for non-meat eaters.

Ingredients

  • splash of oil
  • 1 x bunch of spring onions, green part only
  • 3 x stalks lemongrass (or you can use the ready-minced stuff, I normally do, but yesterday I discovered a “thai-mix” in the veg section in Asda, so for once had fresh lemongrass)
  • 2cm x galangal or ginger, minced or grated (I normally use the ready-minced ginger, but the mix had fresh galangal in it too)
  • 1 red chilli (or more/less to taste)
  • bunch of coriander
  • 3 x chicken breasts (or 6 thighs, or you could use any leftovers from a roast), for a vegetarian option you could leave this out, or replace with tofu, Prawns and fish would also work well.
  • 1/2 red pepper
  • 1 x courgette
  • green beans
  • baby corn
  • 1 litre chicken stock (I used Knorr Touch of Taste as it has no onion or garlic and gives a nice flavour)
  • splash of gluten free soy sauce

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Method

  • Heat a splash of oil in a pan and add the spring onion
  • “Bruise” the lemongrass stalks with a rolling pin and add to the pan
  • Add the galangal, chopped coriander roots/stalks and half the chili
  • Add the chicken stock and the whole chicken breasts, leave to boil for 40 mins (approx.)
  • Remove chicken breasts from the soup mix
  • Add the chopped veg, I used peppers, courgettes, baby corn, green beans, but as usual with my recipes this was a case of what was in the fridge, you can use your preferred veg, but these do work well.
  • Add the remaining chilli (to taste), coriandar leaves and soy sauce
  • shred the chicken breasts using two forks and add back into the pan
  • Serve!

I served mine with @Wbites gluten-free flatbreads, the cumin was a little overpowering, but I think with a bit of a mix up of the spices, possibly with some ground coriander instead of cumin it might be a bit more complementary.

I also sometimes add rice noodles to fill it out a bit, but this time, with all the veg and chicken it was choc-full of ingredients, so I didn’t feel it needed anything else. If you do use rice noodles, just pop them in at the end to heat through in the warmth of the soup

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JM’s FODMAP free burgers

9 Nov

It’s fair to say that alongside sausages, burgers are our all time favourite food so making them FODMAP free and delicious has become a bit of a mission for us. I found this BBC Good Food recipe and adapted it to my own style and let me tell you, they were super tasty! You can make as many as you want with this – it’s great to make a big load and freeze them. You can also add or take away spices depending on your taste. I’ll be trying out a few variations that’s for sure! You can get about 10 big, juicy burgers out of this recipe and they’re super quick with prep time at about 30mins.

1kg/2lb of a good minced beef

300g/10oz of Genius Gluten Free bread whizzed into crumbs

4tbsp Worcestershire sauce

2tbsp of wholegrain mustard

1 small bunch of parsley finely chopped

1 bunch of spring onions finely chopped (green bits only)

2 eggs, beaten

Crumble the mince and breadcrumbs in to a large bowl. Add the Worcestershire sauce, mustard, parsley, spring onions, 3 tsp’s of salt and 1 tsp of pepper. Mix and crumble everything together with your hands. Add the eggs and, using your hands, mix until the ingredients all come together in a big, meaty mass.

Either separate or shape the mix into your 10 juicy burgers or, using a cookie cutter, fill and shape for a more standard and equal size. Separate for store using either cellophane or baking paper. Chill or freeze until ready to cook for at least 24hours to set the meat. Defrost in the fridge before cooking.

To cook you can either fry or grill. We griddled – around 3/4 minutes each side depending on size and cooking preference. We serve in gluten free buns with smoked streaky bacon, blue cheese, iceberg lettuce and a beef tomato with a side helping of SF’s homemade bbq sauce.

Jerky Pork and veg with sweet potato mash

6 Nov

This post has been waiting in our draft folder for ages, for no other reason than work/life/holidays have gotten in the way!

To introduce to you one of our favourite (and quickest/easiest) ways to flavour food which is FODMAP friendly. This is to use Dunn’s River’s Jamaican Jerk seasoning (ta da!). It gives a really nice flavour and has no onion or garlic..

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We use the seasoning on a variety of meats and fish – it gives a great flavour, a bit sweet, a bit salty and a bit spicy, it’s great for livening up what could otherwise be a rather “dull” meal without making it complicated. I have yet to find something it doesn’t work with!

We regularly use it on grilled salmon or chicken, but for a change, last night I decided to double up on the jerk seasoning for dinner. I wanted something quick and easy, as I was fairly late getting in so I just grilled pork chops covered in the jerk seasoning and also made some jerk vegetables, with peppers, courgettes, spring onions, courgettes and cherry tomatoes, a splash of oil and about 2 tsp of dunns river jerk seasoning, making a sort of jerked-ratatouille.

I served this with some mashed sweet potato which I just mashed with a bit of soya spread, salt and pepper.

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Someone asked me on twitter last week about a suggestion for leftover chicken, and while making my jerked ratatouille I thought it could easily be made into a bigger, more filling meal by adding some shredded meat, or chunks of leftover meat – I’ll have a go at this soon I am sure!

The leftover veg and mashed potato made a great quick and easy lunch for me the following day as well!

Toad in the hole

24 Oct

As you might have noticed from previous posts, we love sausages in our house! So further delight ensued when I popped into M&S the other day and discovered their own brand sausages are gluten free! I also noticed that their “Free From” section is getting better all the time, with the addition of biscuits, cakes, a wide selection of breads (in the “real bread” section), crackers etc. I don’t shop there often, but its good to know.

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I much prefer the “finest” or whatever premium sausages are on offer, but as I was using these in addition to a pack of Debbie and Andrew’s Harrogate Sausages, I thought they would be OK, but they paled into insignificance when compared to Debbie and Andrew’s which were recommended to me via Twitter, and are delicious – definitely a rival to The Black Farmer, in fact I might actually prefer them. Debbie and Andrew’s have added herbs and are very meaty, which in a Toad in the Hole work really well!  The M&S ones were similar to any of the cheaper sausages, a slightly breadier, as opposed to meaty, texture, but the flavour was nice, and as I had bought the low fat version, very little fat came out, which is a plus in my book!

So after my sausage discovery I decided to make a great winter dish, Toad in the Hole. A personal favourite! Believe it or not, there are 9 sausages in the below. I was very impressed by the rise achieved from the  yorkshire pudding, and it was just perfect, crispy on the outside but really soft and squishy in the middle. My first Toad in the Hole had the same texture, which was great, but not the rise, so here I got the best of both worlds! I’m not a fan of gravy, so I had it as is and it was moist enough.

I used 2/3 of my dad’s yorkshire pudding mix (de-glutened of course!) and I decided to experiment a little with it, I initially thought about adding some mustard to the mix, but as I was planning to serve the toad with some mustard sweet potato mash, I thought that might be overkill, so I decided to add a bit of spring onion to the mix. I then panicked that the spring onion might be so heavy and knock the air out and leave me with a flat pudding but thankfully that was not the case!

I popped the sausages in the oven to brown for about 15mins, made up the yorkshire pudding mix and left it to rest, giving it an occasional mix. Once the sausages were browned, I turned them and then gave the mix another whisk poured it over, popped it in the oven for 30 mins and voila!

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Best of all, I have some leftovers for my lunch today!

FODMAP Thai green curry

10 Oct

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I adore all Thai food, I went over when I was 18 and developed a total addiction to Pad Thai, Thai Green Curry and Massaman Curry. I did a Thai cookery class during my next visit, but then along came the FODMAP diet, no garlic, no onion, no thai green curry. This was actually one of the first things I searched for a FODMAP recipe for when I started the diet and the first “adventurous” thing I attempted to make, and to be honest, it’s pretty easy and tastes great! The paste can be made in advance and kept in the fridge for a couple of days or in the freezer. Last night I grabbed some chicken and paste from the freezer and 30 mins later I had a delicious Thai green curry for me and my housemates – easy peasy!

I found the recipe on the Cooking with Noting Blog and have made it a few times now. I made a few changes to the recipe, either due to struggles with finding the ingredients or personal preference (or occassionally, being too lazy to go back to the shop when I realised I had forgotten something…).

The curry paste is the bit that takes the longest to prepare, but it is well worth it as curry paste from the supermarket seems to be chock full of garlic and onions. We have a great little blender which cuts down the prep time considerably.

Ingredients

Curry paste:

  • 2 x lemon grass stalks, or I am personally a big fan of these from Gourmet garden: so about 2 tblsp
  • 1-3 green chilis (depending on your spice preference)
  • 1 bunch spring onions, green part only
  • 2-4cm of galangal or ginger, also available from gourmet garden (again approx 2tbsp)
  • 1 bunch of coriander, stalks and leaves – I do think this is best fresh and I love coriander so generally find myself adding some of this too!
  • 1 bunch thai basil – I admit both times I have made this I have been unable to get thai basil so I have used normal italian basil and it has been fine, though I think you need less of it otherwise it can be a bit overpowering
  • ½ tsp ground coriander
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • juice of half a line

Dish:

  • Chicken thighs (I use chicken thighs as they tend to have more flavour, but any chicken will do, you can even use leftovers from a roast chicken!)
  • half bunch spring onions
  • butternut squash
  • 2 peppers (red and yellow – I am not a fan of green ones, but obviously it would work just as well – I particularly like the colours in my food!)
  • baby corn
  • green beans
  • 1 can coconut milk
  • 1tbsp oil

The vegetables can be changed for other vegetables depending on your preference, and for a vegetarian option you can just leave out the chicken and add extra veg or replace it with tofu.

20131009-205818.jpgMethod

  • Finely chop all of the ingredients for your curry paste.
  • If you have a blender, blend them all together, if not use a pestle and mortar, if you don’t have either, chop as finely as you can and combine – it’ll be a little more chunky, but will work just as well! I never get my paste to be quite as paste like as those you buy from the shop!
  • Heat 1 tbsp of oil in a pan
  • Add the curry paste and heat for 1 or two mins, until the flavours are released
  • Add the chicken, and if you are using it, butternut squash to the paste and cook until the chicken has got a little colour and is coated in the curry paste.
  • Add the remaining vegetables and stir through.
  • Add the coconut milk
  • Leave to bubble away for about 20 mins

Serving Suggestions

  • Sticky rice works really well with green curry
  • Or the flavours in Tilda’s coconut, chilli and lemongrass 2 minute rice compliments the curry really well
  • You can add a pint of chicken (or vegetable) stock to the curry to make it into a soup, adding some rice noodles to this works really well.

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